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Plying the mind of Biplane

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Is Biplane to smart for the less smart?

He's to smart, I never understand a word he says!!
0
No votes
I understand Bill's every third word.
2
17%
I totally understand Bills every word (I'm a liar).
0
No votes
I fear Bill's brain!!!!!!!!!!!!!
10
83%
 
Total votes : 12

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The Prophet

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Plying the mind of Biplane

PostThu Apr 06, 2006 7:55 am

Bill,

Can you give me a laymans summation of punctuated equalibrium?

Thanks,

~ Fartin
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Calibur_

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PostFri Apr 07, 2006 12:58 am

I abstain. I understand most of what he says. Except when he does the badger dance.
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XOXO,
Tarianna
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Izzy

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PostFri Apr 07, 2006 9:33 am

I didn't vote because I do understand what he says... and I don't know what the badger dance is, though that's probably best.
Last edited by Izzy on Fri Apr 28, 2006 11:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Mrs. Shelmidine

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Bill's Brain

PostFri Apr 07, 2006 2:10 pm

Of course I understand Bill's every word but that doesn't mean I have to listen to his every word (Moms can do that) By the way the first reponse has a spelling error.
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Biplane

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Yes I can.

PostFri Apr 07, 2006 6:05 pm

Puctuated equilibrium (in contrast to gradualism) is one view within the field of natural history. In essence, under a punctuated equilibrium continuum, life undergoes very little change for a very long time, and then there is an explosion of rapid change and niche radiation (such as the so-called "Cambrian explosion," wherein a great number of the known modern phyla began to appear over a few short million years). This is opposed by gradualism, where, as the name suggests, gradual but constant change occurs over a time period (such as what may have occurred during the Devonian Period).

Biplane's brain out.
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Biplane

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PostSat Apr 08, 2006 9:01 am

*Grin* :D

Biplane out.
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whitejamaican

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PostSat Apr 08, 2006 1:49 pm

Translation: short bursts of rapid evolution. (I took classes in speaking Bill)
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Biplane

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PostMon Apr 10, 2006 8:19 pm

Ya got me Jamaican! I stand translated.

Biplane out.
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The Prophet

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PostSat Apr 15, 2006 4:12 pm

Puctuated equilibrium (in contrast to gradualism) is one view within the field of natural history. In essence, under a punctuated equilibrium continuum, life undergoes very little change for a very long time, and then there is an explosion of rapid change and niche radiation (such as the so-called "Cambrian explosion," wherein a great number of the known modern phyla began to appear over a few short million years). This is opposed by gradualism, where, as the name suggests, gradual but constant change occurs over a time period (such as what may have occurred during the Devonian Period).

Biplane's brain out.


That's pretty much what I remembered on it. Who's theory was this? Gould? Also, is there agreement in the scientific community about which one is most likely to have occured based on the fossil record? Or is a little bit of this and a little bit of that the story?

~ M
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Biplane

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PostWed Apr 19, 2006 10:52 am

Yep. Gould and Eldridge, back in the 70's. The gradualism/Punctuated Equilibrium question is under significant debate, and always has been since the theory was proposed, and likely always will be. Many parts of the fossil record point to very rapid (in a geologic sense) evolution in several periods of geologic time. In particular the Cambrian Period I alluded to previously, in which most of the phyla of Kingdom Animalia first began to appear in the fossil record in just (let me check this now) a 53 million year period. Seems like a long time, no? I mean when you consider that the pyramids are at most perhaps 5,000 years old...and that the first man (or woman) to build a house and plant a seed did so about 12,000 years ago? I mean, a million years is a long time, right?

Well...no.

Not geologically. If it helps to give some perspective, think of the history of time as a single hour. Animal life did not appear until the last ten minutes of this hour, and the whole of human history, everything we've ever known or done, encompasses all of 1/100th of a second of this hour.

For the vast amount of species that began to evolve during this period, 53 million years was extremely rapid. That's about...1/2 a minute on our clock of time.

So...the Cambrian explosion supports Gould's theory very much. Also Gould almost certainly was correct in his description of isolated populations undergoing speciation (which is to say, parts of brook trout populations, for example, that are separated from the rest of the brook trout began to slowly become...not brook trout). There are already a number of sub-species out there which are different from their conspecifics in certain ways, usually color or behavior. For example, the black morph of the gyrfalcon is very common in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, in northern Canada. Subspecies of black bear (appalachian, western, pacific northwest), gray wolf (timber, arctic), amphibians (particularly salamanders around here), and of course Homo sapiens sapiens (Scandanavian, Asian, Germanic, Middle Eastern, Amerindian, African, etc.).

Really, I think he was spot on with speciation, and in some instances (like the Cambrian Explosion and the post-Mesozoic and post-Great-Dying time periods) there seems to be evidence for rapid evolution in a short period, but I personally say that Gould's theory isn't the whole story. I believe that there have been cases where gradual change has been the driving force in the emergence of new species.

Whew.

Biplane out.
Last edited by Biplane on Wed Apr 19, 2006 10:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Biplane

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PostWed Apr 19, 2006 10:58 am

Yeah... sorry about that. Little long. Got a little too excited about it.

Biplane out.
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The Prophet

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PostWed Apr 19, 2006 12:10 pm

No prob, sounds like the good explanation I was expecting actually. Thanks.

~ M
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whitejamaican

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PostThu Apr 27, 2006 9:28 pm

So when can we expect your first professional publication?
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Biplane

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PostSun Apr 30, 2006 3:11 pm

Heh...professional publication...that'll be the day.

Fire Fox

PostThu Sep 28, 2006 10:14 am

:shock: ](*,) :smt015 #-o :smt064 ( the blue guy is bill)
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